Connect with us

Science

Australia Could Be Hit By Destructive 60-Metre-High Tsunami ‘At Any Time’

WEBTHUMBNEW_AusAustralia is in danger of being hit by a devastating 60-metre high tsunami which threatens to strike at any time.  Experts have warned that the country could be hit by destructive waves caused by meteorite strikes, which hard hard to detect and therefore more difficult to prepare for than with landslides or earthquakes, which also cause

Published

on

WEBTHUMBNEW_Aus
Getty

Australia is in danger of being hit by a devastating 60-metre high tsunami which threatens to strike at any time. 

Experts have warned that the country could be hit by destructive waves caused by meteorite strikes, which hard hard to detect and therefore more difficult to prepare for than with landslides or earthquakes, which also cause tsunamis.

Tsunami expert Dr Ted Bryant has found evidence that huge tsunamis have wreaked havoc across the east coast of Australia in the past.

He believes between 4, 000 and 5, 000 years ago, a tsunami hit the Shoalhaven delta, near Nowra, on the New South Wales South Coast which sent water 10km inland.

tsunamiGetty

Evidence has also been found that monumental waves from a past tsunami reached the Blue Mountains, which lay 50km inland.

According to Australian Geographic, Dr Bryant believes the most recent tsunami to have occurred in 1491, which he thinks produced a wave that washed over the harbour’s headlands, 60m above sea level.

A similar wave today could potentially cause mass destruction to the country.

Experts have said the country’s coastal cities have been fortunate not to be struck by destructive waves triggered by meteor impacts or seismic activity, but that it is only a matter of time before the country is hit.

Dale Dominey-Howes, co-director of the Australian Tsunami Research Centre at the University of New South Wales, said:

If it occurred without warning on a Saturday afternoon in summer the impacts would be catastrophic. I suspect it’s only a matter of time before we are affected by something damaging.

Due to their difficulty to detect, Australia’s coastline is monitored 24 hours a day for approaching tsunamis, which are only recorded once every two years in Australia.

Be wary, Australians!

Continue Reading

Science

People Calling For David Attenborough To Appear On New £50 Notes

david attenborough webDavid Attenborough is well known for using his love of wildlife and his endless knowledge of the planet to create breathtaking documentaries which captivate his audience. Throw into the mix his dulcet tones and soothing voice, and the man has become a legend in his own right. Now his status of national treasure has been

Published

on

david attenborough web
AttenboroughGetty

David Attenborough is well known for using his love of wildlife and his endless knowledge of the planet to create breathtaking documentaries which captivate his audience.

Throw into the mix his dulcet tones and soothing voice, and the man has become a legend in his own right.

Now his status of national treasure has been reflected in the public’s recent calls for the 92-year-old broadcaster to appear on our new £50 notes.

Hang on a minute, you might be thinking, wasn’t the government planning to get rid of the £50 only a few months ago?

And you would be right in thinking this. A review in March implied that 1ps, 2ps and the £50 note would be phased out in order to ‘tackle the hidden economy and the illegitimate use of cash’.

However, it has now been decided that a new, polymer £50 note will be in circulation in the near future, to join the polymer fivers and tenners.

Five Pound NotePixabay

The Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury, Robert Jenrick, said:

Our money needs to be secure and this new note will help prevent crime. This modern £50 note follows the popular new pound coin, which is the most secure of its kind in the world.

But let’s get down to the most important thing – Sir David Attenborough. Ever since the announcement of the new note, one thing and one thing only has been on everyone’s mind.

Who’s going to be the face of it? Previously, important historical figures such as Sir Winston Churchill, Charles Darwin and Jane Austen have featured on our notes so clearly a famous name is required.

The Bank of England say they choose people ‘who have shaped UK society through their thought innovation, leadership or values’, in order to celebrate their life.

Let’s face it, who is better suited for the job? Sir David is an inspiration to people across the globe – young and old – and I think he is the perfect match.

And it seems people agree with me, with many on Twitter expressing how passionately they feel about it:

David Attenborough Screenshot@africanewton/Twitter
@Gxorgxdawson/Twitter
David Attenborough Screenshot@CamFB_/Twitter
makieds/Twitter

The people have spoken and they want everyone’s favourite broadcaster to be the new face of our money. If only there was some way of getting his voice inside the note so we could hear his soothing tones whenever we’re feeling a bit down…

Okay, maybe not, I just realised how creepy that would be. Either way, this isn’t the first time that the public have rallied together in an attempt to get Sir David on the front of our notes.

As reported by The Independent, a poll was conducted by YouGov in October last year to find out who Brits wanted to be featured on the new £20 note, which is due to come into circulation in 2020.

Sir David Attenborough came out on top, with a massive 40 per cent of 2,128 of the people surveyed choosing the veteran broadcaster over JK Rowling, Prince Charles and Richard Branson.

david attenboroughPA

Unfortunately for us though, the face of the next £20 note was decided in 2016, when Bank of England Governor, Mark Carney, announced that artist J.M.W. Turner would appear on the note.

Don’t give up hope just yet though, because the face of the new £50 has yet to be announced and everything is to play for!

Let’s just keep our fingers and toes (and arms and legs) crossed until we find out.

If you have a story you want to tell, send it to stories@unilad.co.uk.

Continue Reading

Health

Stephen Hawking Had One Last Warning About The End Of Humanity Before He Died

Stephen AIn a collection of essays which will be published posthumously, the late Professor Stephen Hawking made an eerie prediction regarding the future of humanity.

Published

on

Stephen A

Stephen Hawking predicted a new 'superhuman' race.

In a collection of essays which will be published posthumously, the late Professor Stephen Hawking made an eerie prediction regarding the future of humanity.

Professor Hawking, who died in March 2018 at the age of 76, suggested there would be a new superhuman race, on account of the wealthy elite editing their own DNA and that of their children; manipulating factors such as memory, resistance to disease, cognitive ability and longevity.

The legendary theoretical physicist believed advances in genetic engineering could lead to a new superhuman species, ultimately resulting in the destruction of the rest of humanity.

In an extract of upcoming essay collection – which has been printed in The Sunday Times – Professor Hawking wrote:

I am sure that during this century people will discover how to modify both intelligence and instincts such as aggression,

Laws will probably be passed against genetic engineering with humans. But some people won’t be able to resist the temptation to improve human characteristics, such as memory, resistance to disease and length of life.

Those who are left unedited – i.e. us regular Joes – would face serious problems should this frightening prediction come to pass, helpless to even consider keeping up with the superhumans.

Speaking with the concern for humanity which endeared him to so many, Professor Hawking continued:

Once such superhumans appear, there will be significant political problems with unimproved humans, who won’t be able to compete,

Presumably, they will die out, or become unimportant. Instead, there will be a race of self-designing beings who are improving at an ever-increasing rate.

Frighteningly, Professor Hawking was drawing from existing techniques which are sparking debate within the scientific community.

DNA-editing system Crispr-Cas9, was invented back in 2012, allowing for the modification of harmful genes or for the addition of new ones. Children at London’s Great Ormond Street Hospital who have incurable cases of leukaemia have undergone gene-editing.

However, some scientists believe parents wouldn’t run the risk of modifying genes for fear of side effects.

According to The Sunday Times, many scientist have welcomed Professor Hawking’s predictions, including professor of climate science at University College London, Chris Rapley.

Professor Rapley said:

Humans have arguably reached a critical moment,

We have moved beyond affecting the planet at the landscape scale to interfering with its very metabolism at the global scale. All the indications are that the limitations of our brains, both individually and collectively, leave us incapable of addressing the challenge. On this basis the future looks desperately gloomy.

Even after his death, Professor Hawking’s writings live on; encouraging each and every one of us to think about the future in a considerate and responsible way.

Brief Answers to the Big Questions by Professor Stephen Hawking will be available to purchase in bookshops from October 16, 2018. The perfect Christmas present for a brainy friend or family member.

If you have a story you want to tell send it to UNILAD via stories@unilad.co.uk

Continue Reading

Film

NASA Finally Shut Down Moon Landing Conspiracies Once And For All

NASA MOON WEBOn July 20, 1969, as he stepped onto the surface of the Moon, astronaut Neil Armstrong said ‘that’s one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind’. These words are now some of the most famous in history representing just what ‘mankind’ is capable of, making the impossible seem possible as Armstrong became

Published

on

NASA MOON WEB
neil armstrong buzz aldrin moon landingGetty

On July 20, 1969, as he stepped onto the surface of the Moon, astronaut Neil Armstrong said ‘that’s one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind’.

These words are now some of the most famous in history representing just what ‘mankind’ is capable of, making the impossible seem possible as Armstrong became the first man to walk on the Moon.

A moment that changed the world, director Damien Chazelle’s (Whiplash and La La Land) latest film First Man tells the riveting story behind what is often regarded as one of the greatest events in history.

You can watch a trailer for the movie here:

Focusing on the life of Armstrong, played by Ryan Gosling, First Man looks at what drove the man who took that step onto the Moon to embark on the fateful mission.

Speaking to UNILAD, NASA’s chief historian Bill Barry, who also worked as a consultant on the film, revealed the film will give people ‘a more rounded picture’ of the true story.

He explained:

I think everybody sort of knows the Neil Armstrong story of Apollo 11 and how he was the first man on the Moon but not many people about his personality and what it was like for the families and people on the inside.

The standard narrative of how the Moon missions went is that family members were supportive and there weren’t any problems.

A movie like this gives you a much more intimate look at what was really going on and how those people handled the incredible stresses and strains. It is a reminder of the cost.

apollo 12 mission american flagGetty

For the astronauts aboard Apollo 11, Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins, the mission meant they had to face great sacrifice for the sake of pushing the frontiers of science, knowledge and technology.

Embarking on the craft with ‘a very limited set of objectives’, the mission was really ‘a test run’ to see if mankind could reach the Moon.

As Barry explains, following the success of Apollo 11 NASA became ‘much more ambitious’:

With Apollo 11 there was talk about what they were planning on doing when they got to the Moon thinking one guy would get out on the surface, pick up some rocks, turn around, get back home and launch again. They found though that there was time to do some experiments, time to set some equipment up.

Things got much more ambitious afterwards. Apollo 11 had a kinda general landing area to go to. The Apollo 12 mission, which happened just a few months later, was going to try land next to something we had already put up there. They had something to retrieve so they had to handle a pinpoint landing which they did.

As things went along missions became more complex; they stayed on the Moon longer, did more moonwalks, did more research.

Things became much more ambitious once we had proved the constant distraction, you can do this and successfully operate on the Moon.

footprint on the moonGetty

Celebrating their 60th anniversary this year, NASA has done a lot of amazing things since the organisation’s 1958 formation.

For Barry though, landing on the Moon is the agency’s ‘signature accomplishment’ becoming shorthand for what mankind is capable of – seemingly anything.

In 1961, only three years after NASA was formed, the President of the United States, John F. Kennedy said NASA will take man to the Moon within a decade, and so they did.

apollo 11 mission astronautsGetty

For Barry, this ‘defining event’ didn’t just change the way we looked at space, but also altered our understanding of our home planet too.

He said:

In the grand scheme of things it was one step along the way of what was born from the Hubble space telescope and completely redefined our view of the universe.

We have visited, with probes, every planet in our solar system and a few dwarf planets, asteroids, and comets. We underwent a reconnaissance of the solar system.

With NASA now inventing instruments which could be put on spacecraft to send to other planets, someone one said why don’t we put these on Earth and figure out how our own planet works and so we redefined our understanding of Earth and are still trying to understand how complex it is.

The first pictures of the Earth floating in space had an impact on people on a lot of different levels, the world may seem to be a big place but it is actually a small and fragile place. We all have a responsibility to make sure our spaceship is still functional.

We do indeed Barry!

earthPexels

Despite all the research NASA has undertaken and the evidence provided, various individuals and groups have alleged NASA, in association with other organisations, faked the Moon landings knowingly misleading the public and destroying much evidence in the process.

The conspiracists all have their different stories of what really happened and these ideas are still popular in 2018.

Asking Barry what he thinks of these conspiracy theories, he shot them down explaining NASA at the time didn’t have the technology to fake the landings.

He also added people will look back on these beliefs with embarrassment in the future:

Well the people on social media who do say that sort of stuff are going to be really embarrassed when their grandchildren are visiting the Moon and Apollo memorial landing site, the museum on the Moon in 30/40 years.

When they look at their grandparents Twitter feed they will say ‘boy, you are really stupid’. I think that will happen.

Ultimately there were 400,000 people working on the Moon programme all over planet Earth, it would have been really hard to fake it and technologically we didn’t have the capacity to do so.

Nowadays you can simulate a lot of stuff and make it look good but at the time we couldn’t. We had hours and hours of photos and 800 pounds of rock brought back to planet Earth.

apollo 11Getty

Barry does understand why people may have believed in the conspiracy theories, pointing to the fact at the time much of the information surrounding the landings was classified.

As things became declassified though, it allowed us to learn more about the Apollo missions opening up our understanding of what was really going on in space during the 1960’s and 70’s.

For example, only now are we learning about how close the space race between the US and Soviet Union really was.

Barry emphasised the Soviet determination to beat the United States to the Moon to UNILAD, keeping their competitive programme very secretive.

Commissioning a robot to be built which will land on the Moon and bring back a soil sample, the first one was sent up in June 1969 which blew up.

A month later they launched their second attempt, Luna 15, which was orbiting around the Moon at the same time the Apollo 11 mission arrived.

neil armstrong nasaGetty

This of course led to a very tight race to see which one could bring back a sample from the Moon first as Barry explains:

Neil and Buzz landed on the Moon, did their spacewalk, they went back to the Apollo to try to sleep before they launched the next morning and while they were sleeping the Luna 15 tried to land and actually crashed.

If it had successfully landed on the moon and brought a sample back, which later they actually did, if that one had succeeded though their samples may have got back at a similar time to ours.

They could have said ‘hey, we did it cheaper and didn’t endanger people by sending them up there’. So the race to the Moon which most people think never happened, well it was really close.

In fact it all came down to the last minute on July 20 1969 when the Soviets’ spacecraft crashed – now that must have been tense.

Since the Apollo missions, NASA’s attention has been drawn to Mars. In 2004 US President George Bush Jr. announced a plan to send humans to the Red Planet.

Although this is still NASA’s focus, Barry added that the Moon is still very much on the agency’s mind with plans to send members of the public there.

In fact, with NASA working on sending people to the Moon within the next decade, your trip may not be that far away:

We plan to send people to to the vicinity of the Moon within the next decade or so, in the 2020’s we will be orbiting the Moon working with both commercial and international partners, able to send people to the surface of the Moon.

Then it is working out everything for a trip to Mars. Depending upon budgets etc, maybe we can get to the vicinity of Mars in the 2030’s.

We will eventually have people walking on Mars and a much more robust economy with multiple space stations and people even working on the moon. That is where the US government has told NASA to go, we are talking to the UK space agency etc and they are all on board with the idea.

Honestly, I can’t wait to see where humanity goes next in space!

First Man is showing in UK cinemas now.

If you have a story you want to tell send it to UNILAD via stories@unilad.co.uk.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2017 Zox News Theme. Theme by MVP Themes, powered by WordPress.