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New Drug Could ‘Cure’ Hair Loss In ‘Six Weeks’

bruce willisBald people have been given fresh hope after an eczema drug restored hair growth in a teenage girl with long-standing alopecia. Doctors told how their 13-year-old patient, who has alopecia totalis – a total lack of scalp hair – as well as eczema, experienced ‘significant’ hair regrowth while being treated with dupilumab, a drug marketed

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Bald people have been given fresh hope after an eczema drug restored hair growth in a teenage girl with long-standing alopecia.

Doctors told how their 13-year-old patient, who has alopecia totalis – a total lack of scalp hair – as well as eczema, experienced ‘significant’ hair regrowth while being treated with dupilumab, a drug marketed under the brand name Dupixent.

The unexpected side-effect came from treatment with dupilumab, which is approved for the treatment of moderate to severe eczema, also called atopic dermatitis.

Study senior author Dr Maryanne Makredes Senna, of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in the US, said:

We were quite surprised since this patient hadn’t grown scalp hair since the age of two, and other treatments that can help with hair loss did not in her case.

As far as we know, this is the first report of hair regrowth with dupilumab in a patient with any degree of alopecia areata.

In addition to longstanding alopecia, this girl had also experienced extensive, treatment-resistant eczema since the age of seven months.

Treatment with prednisone and methotrexate, medications that can suppress the overactive immune system, led to limited improvement in her eczema but no hair regrowth and was therefore discontinued.

In July 2017 she began to be treated with weekly injections of dupilumab, which had recently received official approval.

Here are two pictures of a patient, six weeks and 11 months after treatment:

Hair growthSWNS
Hair growthSWNS

After six weeks of treatment, which led to significant improvement in eczema symptoms, she also noticed that fine light hairs called vellus hairs were appearing on her scalp.

After seven months of dupilumab treatment, the girl had grown a ‘significant’ amount of the pigmented hair that typically grows on the scalp.

Because of a change in her insurance coverage, she had to discontinue dupilumab for a two-month period, during which she noticed shedding of the recently regrown hair.

But after she could resume treatment in April this year, the hair growth resumed and has continued.

Dr Senna explained that dupilumab’s mechanism of targeting a key immune system pathway known to be overactive in eczema could explain its action against alopecia, since recent studies have suggested other elements of the same pathway may induce autoimmune hair loss.

She added:

Right now, it’s hard to know whether dupilumab could induce hair growth in other alopecia patients, but I suspect it may be helpful in patients with extensive active eczema and active alopecia areata.

We’ve submitted a proposal for a clinical trial using dupilumab in this patient population and hope to be able to investigate it further in the near future.

Wow. It’s a start isn’t it? Let’s hope the research continues to grow.

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100-Year-Old Man Says Key To Long Life Is Red Wine And Mixed Grills

mixedgrillCATERSSome people believe the Earth is flat, some believe we are living in a simulated reality. 100-year-old Arthur Grisbrook believes the secret to his long life is his diet. And while flat Earthers and scientists work to give credit to their theories, it seems Arthur is living proof of his own. The centenarian still lives

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Arthur cooking a mixed grillCaters

Some people believe the Earth is flat, some believe we are living in a simulated reality.

100-year-old Arthur Grisbrook believes the secret to his long life is his diet. And while flat Earthers and scientists work to give credit to their theories, it seems Arthur is living proof of his own.

The centenarian still lives by himself, does all his cooking and cleaning, and regularly plays the organ in his flat in Hereford. His favourite meal, which he cooks most days, is a mixed grill – with steak, gammon, sausages, a fried egg, mushrooms, tomatoes, peas, chips and hash browns.

Arthur believes his diet, which he washes down with two glasses red wine each night, is the secret to reaching a hundred years.

Arthur, a former Royal Engineer from Buckinghamshire, is frequently told he looks decades younger than his real age, and thinks his diet is to thank – despite what doctors tell him.

The great-grandad-of-three said:

I eat and drink what I fancy and don’t worry about what the so-called ‘experts’ say. I believe in doing things moderately and sensibly. I drink most nights with my meals.

Even in my old age I still want to live as independently as I possibly can.

With age the gullet becomes narrower, that’s just a feature of age. But mixed grills are quite tasty and easy to cook and eat.

I also like making sausage and mash and fish and chips – but of course, my mixed grill is best.

Arthur believes his unique diet has kept him fit and healthy, and says he has no health problems at all.

He added:

I eat what I like but not in excess. I have milk in my coffee and plenty of bread and butter. I have two small glasses of wine with my meals so I imagine I get plenty of iron from that.

I feel no older than being in my late 70s. I don’t feel like I’m 100. You’re only as old as you feel.

Arthur was married to his wife Laura for 66 years, before she sadly died in February this year. He served in the Royal Engineers in World War Two as a driver in Italy and North Africa.

Arthur’s daughter, 72-year-old Margaret Tyler, said:

All my friends say “your dad doesn’t look like he’s 100”. He’s very supportive, undemanding and appreciative. We always love to spend time with him. He’s a remarkable man.

Arthur’s diet isn’t for everyone, however.

100-year-old Eileen, from Lancashire, believes the secret to her own long life is something a bit simpler than a mixed grill – a can of Stella Artois and some custard creams.

Elaine, who works at the care home where Eileen lives, and where they celebrated her 100th birthday this year, said:

Eileen’s not big on bubbly so her favourite tipple was on tap – Stella Artois!

With a packet of custard creams, it’s her not-so-secret self-indulgence.

Does this mean if we live on a diet of mixed grills and red wine, followed by Stella and custard creams, we might live to 200? I’m up for giving it a go.

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School Stops Giving Children Homework Because ‘It’s Too Stressful’

homework featuredIt’s a kid’s dream!

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A school has made every little kid’s dream come true and stopped giving its students homework because of the stress it causes.

Littletown Primary Academy in Devon has stopped giving all its pupils ‘homework’, except for the unlucky souls in Year Six, and is instead asking the kids to spend their time reading.

The scheme will run for the whole academic year and headteacher David Perkins claimed the school reached the decision after consulting with staff, parents and the kids.

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The Midweek Herald reports that research has shown weekly written maths and English homework have little benefit because of the stress it causes families.

Instead the school is recommending that pupils spend 20 minutes reading every evening, which they claim can have huge benefits on a pupil’s outcomes and opportunities.

Mr Perkins explained that reading for 20 minutes a day can make a massive difference to a child’s education adding that the school is raising funds to improve its library.

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Literacy subject leader Cathy Binmore told the Midweek Herald:

Reading is the foundation that underpins all other learning.

Promoting a love of this will set our children up for a life of adventure and intrigue and will enable them to continue learning throughout their lives.

The school’s also recommending that children practise their times tables as well, as studies have shown that this is the best maths homework kids of this age can do.

Research conducted at Stanford University and published in The Journal of Experimental Education suggested that students who spend too much time on homework experience more stress and physical health problems.

Doctor Denise Pope, who worked on the study said:

Our findings on the effects of homework challenge the traditional assumption that homework is inherently good.

A separate study, also conducted at Stanford, found that when teachers cut homework from the curriculum test scores were unaffected suggesting homework isn’t all that.

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Tomorrow Is National Stay At Home Instead Of Going To Work Day

Cosy AWhen you live a busy lifestyle, it’s easy to feel guilty about staying at home and having a quiet day to yourself.

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Tomorrow is stay at home because you are well day.  Deposit

When you live a busy lifestyle, it’s all too easy to feel guilty about staying at home and having a quiet day to yourself.

As somebody with ridiculous levels of Fear of Missing Out (FOMO), I get the panic of being asked about your weekend when you’ve spent it just chilling out at home, enjoying your own company.

We are all expected to pack our precious free time with a ton of activities; socialising and proving to ourselves – and to everyone else – that we are making the absolute most out of life.

However, sometimes it’s nice to just be; taking stock of life, having a little daydream, and spending time having a good old potter around the house.

My perfect ‘at home’ day would probably begin with a generous lie in, before catching up on my favourite podcasts with a sugary cup of tea.

Then I would make myself a lovely, simple lunch – maybe some crumpets and tomato soup – before snuggling up on the sofa with some homemade biscuits and a good book.

Sadly, we only permit ourselves these cosy little bubbles of ‘me time’ when we are already under the weather; using the – often unnecessary – excuse of having a cold or feeling sad.

But why do we harbour such guilt about desiring a few hours away from the hectic world beyond the front door? And why do we have to wait until our noses and eyes are streaming before curling up and giving ourselves a bit of homespun TLC?

After all, making time to take things slow can be greatly beneficial when looking after your mental health; giving you a temporary oasis of calm in a world of constant updates and notifications. What better gift could you give yourself?

Staying at home when you are well can be beneficial for your mental health.20th Television

This is the thinking behind ‘National Stay Home Because You’re Well Day’ (November 30), an annual holiday which encourages people to refresh themselves outside the daily grind of the workplace.

After all, as most working grown-ups will know, the days turn into weeks and the weeks turn into months and you will eventually forget the last time you sat out in your garden or spent an hour or two strumming away on your guitar.

‘Stay Home Because You’re Well Day’ was dreamt up by Thomas and Ruth Roy, who created the holiday under the name of Wellcat Holidays and Herbs.

According to the website Days of the Year:

They [Thomas and Ruth Roy] have stated that it exists so that, “we can all call in “well,” instead of faking illness, and stay home from work.

The point of this holiday is to take a moment to just slow down and enjoy life, seeing as how it has become so very hectic over the recent years, what with the endless barrage of phone calls, text messages, emails, voicemails, etc. that we are faced with on an everyday basis.

And who can argue with that?

Last year, the mindful holiday sparked the hashtag #StayHomeBecauseYoureWellDay, with plenty of hard workers showing their approval.

Even if – like many workers – you haven’t bagged the day off tomorrow, make sure to take a bit of time out for yourself to focus on your own sense of wellbeing.

If you’re experiencing distressing thoughts and feelings, the Campaign Against Living Miserably (CALM) is there to support you. They’re open from 5pm–midnight, 365 days a year. Their national number is 0800 58 58 58, and they also have a webchat service if you’re not comfortable talking on the phone.

If you have a story you want to tell send it to UNILAD via stories@unilad.co.uk

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