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Giant Moose Caught Strolling Down Middle Of Highway

A giant moose in Alaska decided to have a wander down the middle of a highway, and one guy got it on camera.  Usually, to witness large animals casually strolling around near your car, you have to be in the midst of some kind of expensive, drive-through safari experience. Apparently, this is not the case

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Giant Moose Caught Strolling Down Middle Of Highway moose1ViralHog

A giant moose in Alaska decided to have a wander down the middle of a highway, and one guy got it on camera. 

Usually, to witness large animals casually strolling around near your car, you have to be in the midst of some kind of expensive, drive-through safari experience.

Apparently, this is not the case in Alaska.

Robert Farris was taking a midnight drive in Anchorage, Alaska, when he came across a huge moose enjoying an amble down the middle of the highway.

Check out the video here:

The excited driver turned onto the highway, camera at the ready, and said, ‘Look at this big fella here… wow look at him, he’s huge!’

Robert captured the huge animal walking along the grass divide between the two sides of the road, and tried to get its attention by calling out ‘Hey there bud!’

He actually called out ‘Hey there!’ four times with, unsurprisingly, no response from the moose. I think the animal was just after a peaceful stroll.

A passenger in the car, presumably Robert’s daughter, asked the driver if he was going to touch the beast. Thankfully, he replied, ‘No I’m not gonna touch it.’

While calling the moose ‘dude’ repeatedly was a questionable move, I’m glad Robert didn’t attempt to make the moose notice him in a more physical manner – those antlers could cause some damage.

Giant Moose Caught Strolling Down Middle Of Highway moose2ViralHog

After Robert had his fill of late night moose-spotting, he headed off, seemingly attempting one last time to get some sort of reaction by calling out ‘Later dude!’

The moose was a popular sight for the surrounding cars, with one on the other side of the highway actually reversing all the way back and probably risking an accident in order to get a good look at the large-antlered animal.

The man behind the camera had been picking up his daughter when he spotted the moose.

He explained:

I was picking up my daughter when we came across the moose wandering in the street, so I decided to pull up next to the big fella and let the world basque in his awe.

The unusual sight has received mixed opinions from those watching it, with some people bringing to light the sad circumstances that might explain the moose’s choice to wander on the highway.

One person wrote:

Kinda sad. Our increasing population is diminishing their habitat. I bet that road used to covered in grass and trees not so long ago.The tiny strip of remaining grass is almost symbolic of what’s happening to the Moose’s home.

Another added:

I hope he is OK, it looks like he has an injury on his rear leg.

Other concerned viewers told Robert he was crazy for slowing down and getting so close to the animal.

One person commented:

you are crazy. This is dangerous

Another said:

Gentle giant…but with a simple twist of his neck all hell would break loose.

Hopefully the moose got where he was going safely, and no one suffered any reckless reversing or filming-while-driving related injuries.

That would not have been a-moose-ing.

Sorry.

If you have a story you want to tell, send it to stories@unilad.co.uk. 

Animals

Giraffes Were Just Added To List Of Animals Facing Extinction

giraffes1The number of giraffes in the world is sadly declining, and as a result two different species have been added to the ‘critically endangered’ list of animals. The Kordofan giraffe and the Nubian giraffe, which are found across East, Central and West Africa, are now classified as ‘critically endangered’, while the Reticulated giraffe, which is

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giraffesPixabay

The number of giraffes in the world is sadly declining, and as a result two different species have been added to the ‘critically endangered’ list of animals.

The Kordofan giraffe and the Nubian giraffe, which are found across East, Central and West Africa, are now classified as ‘critically endangered’, while the Reticulated giraffe, which is native to the Horn of Africa, is listed as ‘endangered’. Other species of giraffe have also been graded as ‘vulnerable’ and ‘near threatened’.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species has revealed that these giraffes are ‘in serious trouble’.

These species of giraffe were listed as ‘vulnerable’ on the Red List in 2016, but have now been ‘uplisted’ on the 2018 update.

There are currently nine subspecies of giraffe, seven of which have been assessed by the IUCN. Five of the subspecies were assessed for the first time ever, so it was a shock for researchers that three of them are now endangered.

The only species of giraffe to listed as ‘least concern’ is the Angolan giraffe, which is found mainly in Botswana, Namibia and Zimbabwe. The South African giraffe also appears to be doing well, while the numbers of Masai giraffe have ‘plummeted’ and ‘will most likely be placed within one of the threatened categories of the IUCN Red List’ according to an IUCN report.

Dr Julian Fennessy, co-chair of the IUCN Special Survival Commission, and the Giraffe & Okapi Specialist Group, and Director of the Giraffe Conservation Foundation, said:

Whilst giraffe are commonly seen on safari, in the media, and in zoos, people – including conservationists – are unaware that these majestic animals are undergoing a silent extinction.

While giraffe populations in southern Africa are doing just fine, the world’s tallest animal is under severe pressure in some of its core ranges across East, Central and West Africa.

It may come as a shock that three of the currently recognised nine subspecies are now considered ‘Critically Endangered’ or ‘Endangered’, but we have been sounding the alarm for a few years now.

Some species of giraffe, however, seem to be thriving, as the West African and Rothschild’s giraffe, which were previously considered ‘endangered’, have improved their conservation status. This is thanks to the African governments and conservation organisations working together, with guidance from the Giraffe Conservation Foundation.

Arthur Muneza, East-Africa Coordinator of the Giraffe Conservation Foundation, said:

This is a conservation success story and highlights the value of making proactive giraffe conservation and management efforts in critical populations across the continent.

Working collaboratively with governments and other partners, we feel that our proactive measures are saving giraffe in some areas before it is too late.

It is now timely to increase our efforts, especially for those listed as ‘Critically Endangered’ and ‘Endangered’.

Giraffes are currently under threat from illegal hunting, as well as loss of habitat due to human activities like agriculture and mining.

The critically endangered Kordofan and Nubian giraffe are now considered some of the most threatened large mammals in the world.

If you have a story you want to tell send it to UNILAD via stories@unilad.co.uk

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Animals

Lil Bill Is ‘World’s Smallest Cow’ And Is Size Of Domestic Cat

lilbill4After the staggering expanse of some of the cows we’ve seen recently, people have been calling out across the world for more bovine content. Thankfully, the world listened, and here we have for you what is thought to be the world’s smallest cow. We’ve had Knickers and Dozer, and those guys were undeniably impressive in

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small cowMississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine/Facebook

After the staggering expanse of some of the cows we’ve seen recently, people have been calling out across the world for more bovine content.

Thankfully, the world listened, and here we have for you what is thought to be the world’s smallest cow.

We’ve had Knickers and Dozer, and those guys were undeniably impressive in their stature. But Lil’ Bill is going to be melting hearts everywhere thanks to his diminutive size.

The little fella weights just 4.5kg, which is about the same a domestic cat, but just a tenth of what other cows his age should weigh.

The calf was taken to the Mississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine by his owners. But thankfully, Lil Bill’ has had the all clear from vets, he’s just a lot smaller than the other cows.

Posting on their Facebook page, the vets said:

Occasionally, we get a case that has us scratching our heads a bit. Lil’ Bill is one of those cases! He was born weighing a little over one-tenth of what newborn calves typically weigh. Stay tuned for more updates on Lil’ Bill!

small cow at vetsMississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine/Facebook

At the moment, however, the vets have not revealed the reasons why they think Lil Bill is so small, though they are working on a diagnosis.

They wrote:

Rest assured that Lil Bill is still receiving incredible care and lots of love! We are working on a story that will give you all an idea of why he’s so small, what we’re doing for him, and what his prognosis is, so keep your eyes peeled!

small cowMississippi State University College of Veterinary Medicine/Facebook

The appearance of Lil Bill comes just days after the story of the barnyard behemoth that is Knickers went viral.

Knickers, who lives in Western Australia, stands at 6ft 4inches tall, and weighs in at a whopping 220st. Knickers is what’s known as a ‘coach’ or a ‘steer’ – a castrated male cow that leads other cattle in the herd.

Knickers’ owner, Geoff Pearson, tried to sell the cow at auction last month. However, meat processors at the auction said they couldn’t take him as he was simply too big.

Instead, Knickers will live out his days at Geoff’s farm on Lake Preston, Myalup – around 85 miles south of Perth.

knickers the massive cow7 News

Speaking about how Knickers got his name, Geoff said:

When he was young, when we first got him, we had a Brahman steer [a breed of cattle] which was a friend of his.

So his name was Bra… so we [had] Bra and Knickers. We never thought he would turn into a big knickers.

Massive Knickers, Geoff! However, news of Knickers caught wind, and another cow – called Dozer – challenged the Australian to the title.

Dozer, from Kismet Creek Farm in Manitoba, Canada, apparently stands at six feet five inches – pipping Knickers to the post by an inch.

One of the most frequent questions we keep getting is "Just how tall is Dozer, anyway?" The media started calling us and…

Posted by Kismet Creek Farm on Thursday, 29 November 2018

Dozer is described by his owners as ‘the friendliest animal’, and ended up on their farm/animal sanctuary after being saved from a beef farm by a vegan lady in Alberta.

Who’d have thought 2018’s biggest craze was cow sizes. Can’t wait to see what 2019 holds for us.

If you have a story you want to tell send it to UNILAD via stories@unilad.co.uk

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Animals

Lion Struggles To Fight Off 20 Hyenas Until His Bro Turns Up To Help Him

LionH_faceIncredible TV.

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Lion being attacked by hyenasBBC

A male lion was targeted by about 20 hyenas, and almost certainly would have lost if it wasn’t for his brother’s help.

David Attenborough delivered in an episode of Dynasties that saw the King of jungle nearly fall from his thrown as the pack of cackling hyena surrounded him.

Red, a male lion, stumbled into the pack of hyenas who ordinarily would have no chance against a lion, but because Red was so outnumbered, they took their chance and tried to attack him.

Here’s the full video:

It was a nail-biting scene and I couldn’t help but feel like I was watching The Lion King play out.

‘Surely Mufasa, I mean Red, has to win?’, I said to myself as the male lion got more and more tired.

It was a desperate battle. Red was trying to attack individual hyenas while the rest of the pack were biting him from behind.

Lion being attacked by hyenasBBC

The Hyena Project in Ngorongoro Crater writes:

Spotted hyenas and lions compete over prey almost every day, especially when they kill large prey.

Against common belief, lions steal more kills from hyenas than vice versa and hyenas hunt most of their food themselves.

A lion male is twice the size of a spotted hyena and three to four times as heavy, and one single paw stroke can kill an adult hyena. Hyenas therefore are careful during encounters with adult lions for good reason.

Lion being attacked by hyenasBBC

Just when it looked like there was no hope, another male lion from Red’s pride appeared in the distance.

That back-up was all he needed, and when the pack of hyenas spotted a second lion, they bolted.

Even with 20 of them, two male lions would be an audacious battle to enter into.

The video ends with the two lions playing and cuddling after Red’s close shave.

The video received nearly nine million views at the time of writing, so it could rival other Attenborough scenes like the iguana vs snakes.

What Dynasties is teaching me is the true brutal competition of mother nature.

When I found out the lion cubs that were born in a recent episode had died, I couldn’t take it.

The episode followed the Marsh Pride in Kenya’s Masai Mara, with strong, independent lioness Charm giving birth to two beautiful lion cubs; one male, one female.

Viewers were utterly besotted by the little cubs, who devoted mum Charm had defended so ferociously against buffalo. Everyone within the pride and at home had been rooting for the newborns to survive and thrive.

The two lion cubs had been born away from the rest of the pride and only met their fellow lions when they were six weeks old.

Sadly, when the crew headed back to Kenya after the documentary had wrapped they made a tragic discovery. The two young lions had passed away, and it is thought they could have been killed by predators or buffalo.

I guess that is the true circle of life.

If you have a story you want to tell send it to UNILAD via stories@unilad.co.uk.

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