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Britain Votes Coca-Cola As Its Favourite Logo

Coca-Cola Predicts Drop In Profit This YearBritain’s favourite logo is Coca-Cola’s, according to a poll. The iconic red and white symbol was first revealed in the late 1800s and has remained largely unchanged ever since. It’s so popular the logo can commonly found on fashionable clothing items, homeware and other desirables – while vintage items featuring the logo can sell for

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Britain’s favourite logo is Coca-Cola’s, according to a poll.

The iconic red and white symbol was first revealed in the late 1800s and has remained largely unchanged ever since.

It’s so popular the logo can commonly found on fashionable clothing items, homeware and other desirables – while vintage items featuring the logo can sell for thousands.

Second spot was secured by US fast-food chain, McDonald’s – ahead of Disney’s Mickey Mouse silhouette logo in third and confectionery giant, Cadbury’s logo in fourth.

Commissioned by label makers, Avery, the research of 2,000 UK adults found 62 per cent consider logos such as those belonging to Hard Rock Café and Ferrari to be ‘works of art’.

Fiona Mills, marketing director for Avery UK said:

Last year we conducted research which highlighted the impact design and branding can have in terms of persuasiveness, consumer trust and consumer perception.

The findings showed the results can be extremely powerful if you get the ingredients of label design spot on.

These ingredients can include handwritten fonts, bold colours and shapes, emotion and use of heuristics – the brain’s mental decision-making shortcuts.

Other logos in the top 10 include the emblems for Nike, Guinness and LEGO – along with those for Michelin and PG Tips.

Nostalgia appears to play a part with long established logos such as Fisher-Price, Oxo, Wall’s and Colman’s all featuring.

However relative newcomers such as Amazon, Google, Virgin and Starbucks made the top 40 too.

The research also found a product’s logo is so important it’s the first thing we notice about a product – ahead of the product’s name and even its colour.

Logos are also a key part of what makes a brand memorable – 46 per cent said they are the most enduring aspect of a brand.

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A fifth are so loyal to particular brands they will specifically purchase branded products over non-branded counterparts – despite them often costing more.

But 33 per cent will only buy from brands they are familiar with – and for 53 per cent, familiarity makes them trust a brand more.

The poll also looked at the logos and brands we find most memorable from different decades – from the Sixties through to the Noughties.

And it emerged the Eighties is the most popular era when it comes to logos, packaging and branding.

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However 47 per cent think products and their packaging look better now than they ever have done before.

Branding belonging to Maxwell House, Nestle Milkybar and Kodak were found to be the most enduring of those from the Sixties.

Old Spice, Fairy washing-up liquid and Wimpy were identified as the most recognisable from the Seventies.

The most memorable ones from the Eighties are Coca-Cola, Pepsi and Nesquik according to those polled.

And similarly the most unforgettable logos from the Nineties belong to Adidas, Lynx and The Body Shop.

While Costa Coffee, Dove and Red Bull’s are the ones most associated with the Noughties.

Fiona Mills added:

In our previous studies, a behavioural scientist highlighted the important part imagery and font have to play when creating strong, persuasive labels for products or packages.

When you look at the brands who are most remembered from the decades these findings really apply, it is easy to picture many of their labels clearly in your mind.

The results of this study don’t just apply to big business, there are many useful lessons for smaller organisations. Small businesses can learn a lot from looking at the expertise of bigger brands as well as downloading the free Avery report for some scientific insight into branding.

Mine’s Leeds United’s crest, although for completely different reasons.

If you have a story you want to tell send it to UNILAD via stories@unilad.co.uk.

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Health

100-Year-Old Man Says Key To Long Life Is Red Wine And Mixed Grills

mixedgrillCATERSSome people believe the Earth is flat, some believe we are living in a simulated reality. 100-year-old Arthur Grisbrook believes the secret to his long life is his diet. And while flat Earthers and scientists work to give credit to their theories, it seems Arthur is living proof of his own. The centenarian still lives

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Some people believe the Earth is flat, some believe we are living in a simulated reality.

100-year-old Arthur Grisbrook believes the secret to his long life is his diet. And while flat Earthers and scientists work to give credit to their theories, it seems Arthur is living proof of his own.

The centenarian still lives by himself, does all his cooking and cleaning, and regularly plays the organ in his flat in Hereford. His favourite meal, which he cooks most days, is a mixed grill – with steak, gammon, sausages, a fried egg, mushrooms, tomatoes, peas, chips and hash browns.

Arthur believes his diet, which he washes down with two glasses red wine each night, is the secret to reaching a hundred years.

Arthur, a former Royal Engineer from Buckinghamshire, is frequently told he looks decades younger than his real age, and thinks his diet is to thank – despite what doctors tell him.

The great-grandad-of-three said:

I eat and drink what I fancy and don’t worry about what the so-called ‘experts’ say. I believe in doing things moderately and sensibly. I drink most nights with my meals.

Even in my old age I still want to live as independently as I possibly can.

With age the gullet becomes narrower, that’s just a feature of age. But mixed grills are quite tasty and easy to cook and eat.

I also like making sausage and mash and fish and chips – but of course, my mixed grill is best.

Arthur believes his unique diet has kept him fit and healthy, and says he has no health problems at all.

He added:

I eat what I like but not in excess. I have milk in my coffee and plenty of bread and butter. I have two small glasses of wine with my meals so I imagine I get plenty of iron from that.

I feel no older than being in my late 70s. I don’t feel like I’m 100. You’re only as old as you feel.

Arthur was married to his wife Laura for 66 years, before she sadly died in February this year. He served in the Royal Engineers in World War Two as a driver in Italy and North Africa.

Arthur’s daughter, 72-year-old Margaret Tyler, said:

All my friends say “your dad doesn’t look like he’s 100”. He’s very supportive, undemanding and appreciative. We always love to spend time with him. He’s a remarkable man.

Arthur’s diet isn’t for everyone, however.

100-year-old Eileen, from Lancashire, believes the secret to her own long life is something a bit simpler than a mixed grill – a can of Stella Artois and some custard creams.

Elaine, who works at the care home where Eileen lives, and where they celebrated her 100th birthday this year, said:

Eileen’s not big on bubbly so her favourite tipple was on tap – Stella Artois!

With a packet of custard creams, it’s her not-so-secret self-indulgence.

Does this mean if we live on a diet of mixed grills and red wine, followed by Stella and custard creams, we might live to 200? I’m up for giving it a go.

If you have a story you want to tell send it to UNILAD via stories@unilad.co.uk

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Grub

Vegan Restaurant Sends Woman To Hospital After Giving Her Dairy

veganA woman was hospitalised after the vegan restaurant she was eating at gave her a meal with dairy in.  Vittoria Rabito was eating at Vegandale Brewery in Toronto, Canada, on November 9 when she realised something was wrong with the vegan pulled pork taco she’d ordered. Rabito has had a severe allergy to dairy since she

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A woman was hospitalised after the vegan restaurant she was eating at gave her a meal with dairy in. 

Vittoria Rabito was eating at Vegandale Brewery in Toronto, Canada, on November 9 when she realised something was wrong with the vegan pulled pork taco she’d ordered.

Rabito has had a severe allergy to dairy since she was born. Although she isn’t vegan herself, she considers vegan restaurants ‘safe’ places to eat at as they market themselves as free of all animal products, including dairy.

The customer informed her server at Vegandale Brewery of her situation, and they assured her all of their products were vegan and therefore dairy-free – though they didn’t rule out the possibility of cross-contamination at the factory level.

Moments after tucking in to her meal, Rabito’s heart rate increased and her lips began to tingle. She started to have trouble breathing and decided to go to the bathroom to administer her EpiPen; something she’d had to do only once previously in her life.

Within 10 minutes of tasting the vegan pulled pork taco, Vittoria was taken in an ambulance and rushed to hospital as she suffered with the worst reaction she’d ever had.

Recalling the moment she started to suffer, Rabito told VICE:

I remember my body started shaking within seconds of taking a bite and it didn’t stop until an hour or two into being into the hospital.

When you go to a vegan restaurant and you have a dairy allergy, you’re hoping that they take [cross-contamination] seriously and that they are dairy-free. So that night I thought I was going crazy.

If you’re calling yourself a vegan restaurant, there is an assumption that the restaurant has done all of their due diligence with sourcing their product from the manufactures that their products are vegan.

If they can’t do that, they should not be calling themselves vegan.

Over two weeks after the incident the restaurant confirmed the cause behind Rabito’s reaction, explaining in an email the ‘vegan seasoning’ on her meal may have contained traces of milk.

Vegandale Brewery added they were not aware of the possible hazard of the seasoning arriving in unlabelled packaging.

By way of apology the restaurant’s general manager offered Vittoria and her father a complimentary meal at one of their other locations, but dad Charlie said the response was ‘absolutely absurd’.

He added:

They don’t have a clue as to what could have happened to Vittoria. We could have been dealing with Vittoria’s funeral had she not acted quickly in the way that she did.

As a vegan restaurant, if you’re not able to fulfil that everything is dairy-free there should be some disclosure that they are not able to guarantee that the food is free of animal products. From a moral perspective that would be the right thing to do.

VICE report the general manager no longer works at the restaurant, and Elliot Johnson, the kitchen manager at Vegandale Brewery, admitted the way the situation had been dealt with was ‘unacceptable’.

In response to the incident Vegandale Brewery is seeking a fully vegan supplier, though the ingredients in Rabito’s vegan pulled pork tacos have not been changed.

Instead the menu has been updated to ‘provide a more fulsome allergen notice’, which makes clear the risk of production level cross-contamination.

According to a representative from Toronto Public Health, as there are ‘no specific requirements in the Food Premises Regulation for vegan restaurants’ in terms of cross-contamination, vegan restaurants have no legal obligation to disclose if their products come in contact with eggs or dairy.

Hopefully Vittoria won’t be faced with any similar situations in the future.

If you have a story you want to tell, send it to stories@unilad.co.uk. 

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Life

Third Of Brits Think Lapland Is A Fictional Place, Study Finds

lapland1Almost a third of Brits believe Lapland is a fictional place, according to a study. Researchers who polled 2,000 adults found many are clueless about the region, with one in 10 having checked the internet to find out if it is a real location or not. Just 22 per cent understand Lapland spans across Norway,

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Almost a third of Brits believe Lapland is a fictional place, according to a study.

Researchers who polled 2,000 adults found many are clueless about the region, with one in 10 having checked the internet to find out if it is a real location or not.

Just 22 per cent understand Lapland spans across Norway, Finland, Sweden, and part of Russia.

One in 10 adults believe ‘Santa’s land’ covers just Iceland and Greenland, while a fifth think it is a country in its own right.

A spokesman for TUI, which carried out the study and offer day trips and breaks to Lapland, said:

Whilst TUI have been sending people to Lapland for a long time you can understand why many Brits believe Lapland is a made up place, as much of the region is magical and if you haven’t visited, you might only think of it as the fictional home of Santa.

In reality, Lapland is a huge place spanning multiple countries, despite being very sparsely populated.

But Lapland isn’t the only location to cause confusion, according to the study by TUI – 32 per cent have no idea Transylvania is on the map, while a further 38 per cent don’t believe in Christmas Island.

Incredibly, seven per cent of adults think Hogwarts – the school of wizardry in the famous Harry Potter novels – is a real place.

And six per cent believe the home of Batman, Gotham City, exists.

In contrast, 26 per cent of Brits don’t know Easter Island was real, while 57 per cent are baffled about the Mumbles in Swansea Bay.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, 38 per cent of adults don’t know Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch is a village situated in Anglesey in Wales.

More than a third of adults admit their geographical knowledge is so poor they have had to check on a globe or a map to see if a place was real or not – but by doing so, one in 10 then went on to book a holiday in that location.

Sadly one in 10 Brits were left red-faced after trying to book a holiday to somewhere that turned out to be a fictional destination.

But of those who do believe Lapland is a real place – 55 per cent would love to visit one day, the OnePoll study found.

The spokesman for TUI added:

The study indicates many people are unsure about which places are real and which are not – and we tend to get so absorbed in fantasy worlds such as Harry Potter and Batman, it’s no wonder we can get confused about whether they exist in reality.

The great thing about Lapland is it’s absolutely real and the magic is truly spectacular.

There is so much to do as well as visiting the main man himself; it is one of the best places to see the Northern Lights and TUI offers many activities including snowmobile rides and the scenery is incredible.

TUI offers day trips and three night breaks to a variety of areas in Lapland including new gateway Kussamo where, once you’ve been given your thermals, you can experience huskies and reindeers whilst finishing the trip with a visit to Father Christmas and a traditional Christmas dinner.

If you have a story you want to tell send it to UNILAD via stories@unilad.co.uk

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