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Baby girl with heart defect died in hospital hours after her parents were told she was ‘stable’

A BABY girl died just hours after her parents were told she was “stable and settled”, an inquest heard. Iris Ann Day died at just six-months-old after her worried parents rushed her to hospital when she started to have breathing difficulties. Lawyers representing distraught parents Hannah and Ben have since told the inquest that on-duty staff at […]

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A BABY girl died just hours after her parents were told she was “stable and settled”, an inquest heard.

Iris Ann Day died at just six-months-old after her worried parents rushed her to hospital when she started to have breathing difficulties.

Iris Ann Day had been rushed to hospital by her parents, but tragically passed away
PA:Press Association

Lawyers representing distraught parents Hannah and Ben have since told the inquest that on-duty staff at the hospital “failed to appreciate” her deteriorating condition.

An inquest into the baby’s death was opened at Chelmsford Coroner’s Court, with nurse Cracknell, who was a deputy sister at the time, admitting she noted an increase in Iris’s heart rate and respiratory rates but failed to notify a doctor.

She said: “I was reassured by the doctors, they weren’t too concerned at that time.

“They felt her condition had improved despite the observations.”

I don’t think we appreciated how unwell she was

Dr Yemi Adenekan

Iris was born with Down syndrome and an atrio-ventricular septal defect, which was discovered when her mother Hannah was 36 weeks pregnant.

Her parents were told she would need surgery to repair the condition when she was around three-months-old, arranged under the care of Evelina London Children’s Hospital.

But delays, one resulting from a lack of beds at the intensive care unit, meant the operation came too late and Iris died on December 2 2016.

The tot had been rushed to Colchester General Hospital’s A&E department about midnight after she became unwell, with her parents staying with her all night.

In the hours before Iris’s death, Dr Yemi Adenekan admitted he tried and failed three times to fit a cannula, which is placed inside a vein to allow administration of fluids.

He added: “I don’t think we appreciated how unwell she was.”

A nurse who tried to fetch medicine to help Iris admitted she twice found it to be out of date.

Paediatric consultant Dr Bhupinder Sihra also told the inquest that he had checked on the tot about 10am, and that she seemed “relatively stable”.

The inquest is due to continue tomorrow.


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NHS rolling out free smartphone app WaitLess that could slash A&E waiting times

A&E wait times could be cut with the help of a new free smartphone app, NHS chiefs hope. It gives patients news of queues at nearby hospitals, as well as live traffic reports for their area. The app, called WaitLess, has been trialled across East Kent but its makers are ready to roll it out […]

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A&E wait times could be cut with the help of a new free smartphone app, NHS chiefs hope.

It gives patients news of queues at nearby hospitals, as well as live traffic reports for their area.

The app could reduce pressure on A&E departments
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The app, called WaitLess, has been trialled across East Kent but its makers are ready to roll it out across England.

Alistair Martin, from Transforming Systems, said: “It is about giving patients a better experience and taking some of the pressures off A&E. We are speaking to other areas.”

NHS officials want it adopted nationwide at a time when most hospitals are failing to meet A&E targets.

Joyce Robins from Patient Concern added: “Anything that helps you get seen more quickly has to be a good idea.”

WaitLess uses real-time updates and geo-location technology
Alamy

Dr Taj Hassan, president of the Royal College of Emergency Medicine, said choice will be limited as most A&Es were swamped.

He added: “Whilst guidance is helpful, the best solution would be to ring 111.”

Other digital innovations include a sensor that picks up the deadly condition sepsis 12 hours faster than current tests.

NHS England head Simon Steven said: “Modern medicine is on the cusp of a huge shift in how care is delivered.”

'Axe' for ops rule

NHS rules which guarantee non-urgent ops within 18 weeks face being scrapped, a top Tory MP has claimed.

Hospital chiefs have already imposed a temporary limit on waiting list surgery to protect funding for A&E, mental health and GPs.

Commons health committee chair Sarah Wollaston said the rule will have to go unless funding is found. She said: “There’s a pretence we can do everything within existing budgets.”

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Incredible video shows gene editing technique CRISPR destroying diseased DNA – and it could wipe out inherited conditions in the future

AN Incredible video shows how a cutting-edge gene editing technique destroys diseased DNA. The footage might not look like much to the untrained eye – but what you are actually looking at is a highly advanced medical technique that experts have hailed as having the potential to eradicate genetic diseases. The technique – called CRISPR […]

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AN Incredible video shows how a cutting-edge gene editing technique destroys diseased DNA.

The footage might not look like much to the untrained eye – but what you are actually looking at is a highly advanced medical technique that experts have hailed as having the potential to eradicate genetic diseases.

The CRISPR enzyme attaches to a strand of DNA
https://mobile.twitter.com/hnisimasu/status/928933260159197184/photo/1

The technique – called CRISPR – allows scientists to edit a genome by removing, replacing or adding to parts of the DNA sequence.

The bright yellow dot in the centre is a blob of the CRISPR enzyme guiding ribonucleic acid (RNA).

Guiding RNA helps scientists pinpoint the diseased bit of DNA so they can send the enzyme to it.

And the darker orange coloured strands you see twisting through the screen are stands of DNA.

 

The CRISPR enzyme has attached to the diseased part of the DNA that is responsible for a genetic mutation.

There is little purple arrow you can see pointing to the blob which is actually pointing to the exact spot where you can see the technique obliterate the genetic mutation.

This is how scientists could end up wiping out genetic diseases in the future.

It is the first time we have been able to see exactly how the technique works as the molecules involved are so tiny.

A guiding RNA helps CRISPR to find where to break the DNA
A guiding RNA helps CRISPR to find where to break the DNA
https://mobile.twitter.com/hnisimasu/status/928933260159197184/photo/1

The video was part of a paper published in the journal Nature Communications by a team of researchers led by Mikihiro Shibata of Kanazawa University and Hiroshi Nishimasu of the University of Tokyo.

 

Genes are passed down from parents to their offspring, and any mutations or mistakes in the DNA sequence can lead to deformities and genetic illnesses affecting the vital organs.


‘HOLY GRAIL OF GENETICS’ What is CRISPR, how does gene editing work, who discovered the technique and could it mean we live longer?


The gene editing technique has been used successfully in mammals in recent years.

One research team managed to “cut out” HIV from the DNA of mice, showing it is possible to stop the deadly virus replicating in the body.

In 2016 scientists won permission to try the technique on human embryos for the first time.

The darker orange strand of DNA can be seen breaking away at the end of the video
The darker orange strand of DNA can be seen breaking away at the end of the video
https://mobile.twitter.com/hnisimasu/status/928933260159197184/photo/1

Experts say within 20 years the method could lead to a cure for all inherited diseases including many types of cancer.

But critics warn the technology could be abused to create “designer” babies.

The technique could allow scientists to alter the colour of a baby’s eyes or hair, height or intelligence by picking and choosing their DNA.

HOW DOES CRISPR WORK?

The new technique allows scientists to edit a genome by removing, replacing or adding to parts of the DNA sequence.

It consists of two key molecules that introduce a mutation into the DNA.

One is an enzyme called Cas9 that rips open the double-stranded DNA string at the desired point.

Another is a piece of RNA – a similar type of structure to DNA that is used as a template in natural processes within cells such as repairing DNA.

A pre-designed RNA string created in a lab binds to the target DNA, acting as a guide so the Cas9 is delivered to the exact location it is needed.

This allows scientists to cut out parts of the genetic material while leaving the rest untouched. They can also add in new sections of DNA taken from another organism.


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Firefighter left with tennis ball-size hole in his leg after flesh-eating bug ate away at his calf

A FIREMAN was left with a tennis ball-sized hole in his left leg after a flesh-eating bug ate his calf. Tracy Rumble, 51, was kept in hospital for nine days and was out of action for a further six months. The dad-of-one suddenly began vomiting violently while watching TV in 2011 and was taken to […]

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A FIREMAN was left with a tennis ball-sized hole in his left leg after a flesh-eating bug ate his calf.

Tracy Rumble, 51, was kept in hospital for nine days and was out of action for a further six months.

Tracy Rumble believes he caught the flesh-eating bug when he was putting out a fire at a dirty house
SWNS:South West News Service

The dad-of-one suddenly began vomiting violently while watching TV in 2011 and was taken to hospital by his wife.

Doctors discovered a red, swollen lump on Tracy’s leg that was causing him excruciating pain.

But they told him he had a condition called cellulitis – a bacterial infection in the deeper layers of skin.

Tracy was sent home but the following day the redness had spread and he returned to A&E.

The infection started off as a small red patch on his leg and quickly spread
The infection started off as a small red patch on his leg and quickly spread
SWNS:South West News Service

He was eventually diagnosed with necrotising fasciitis – a flesh-eating bug that can lead to limb loss or death – and had surgery to scoop out the infected flesh.

Tracy, a fire marshal in Indianapolis, believes he may have been struck down after attending the scene of a nasty fire in a dirty house.

“I was investigating this nasty house and I think maybe I got it from there, but I wear uniform pants,” he said.

“Somehow it must have got under those.

Doctors were forced to scoop out the infected flesh during surgery
Doctors were forced to scoop out the infected flesh during surgery
SWNS:South West News Service

“I never thought I would end up in hospital for something like that.”

Now Tracy, who still has a huge scar from the trauma, wants to warn others about the bug and urged people to get mysterious red marks checked out.

“The doctors said it could have been caused by bacteria getting into a cut or even an infected hair,” he said.

“It was creeping up my leg and could have continued to eat through my flesh.

“I’m just glad I’ve still got a leg. I’m a survivor.”

Tracy has been left with two scares on his leg
Tracy has been left with two scares on his leg
SWNS:South West News Service

The first signs of the infection showed when he suddenly fell ill with a fever and vomiting and later discovered the painful red patch.

Tracy, who has a 12-year-old son called Tyler, said: “When I saw how swollen and red my leg was I was like ‘holy cr*p’.

“It was burning hot – I couldn’t even touch it.”

Medics were forced to operate on Tracy’s leg to remove all the infected flesh.

He was left with two holes in his legs but was lucky to avoid amputation.

A SERIOUS BACTERIAL INFECTION THAT EATS AWAY YOUR FLESH

Necrotising fasciitis is a rare but serious bacterial infection that affects the tissue beneath the skin, the surrounding muscles and organs.

It’s often referred to as a “flesh-eating” disease, though the bacteria don’t eat the flesh.

Rather, they release toxins that damage the nearby tissue.

The condition can start from a relatively minor injury, such as a small cut, but can progress and get worse very fast.

If it’s not recognised quickly, the condition can become life-threatening.

Symptoms can develop suddenly, and early signs include:

  • A small but painful cut or scratch on the skin
  • Intense pain that’s put of proportion to the damage on the skin
  • A high temperature, or fever – similar to flu.

After a few days, it’s likely you’ll notice:

  • Swelling or redness in the area, which will often feel firm to the touch
  • Diarrhoea and vomiting
  • Dark patches on the skin that turn into fluid-filled blisters.

Necrotising fasciitis is a medical emergency that can spread very quickly.

If you suspect you are suffering with it, it is important you dial 999 immediately.

“The bottom hole was all the way to my muscle,” he said.

“My son could look in and see my muscle moving when I wiggled my toes.

“He called it ‘gross cool’.

“The top hole was like a canyon. It was three inches across by five or six inches down.

“If they hadn’t have cut it out they would have had to amputate my leg.”

Tracy said that if the infection had spread he could have lost his leg
Tracy said that if the infection had spread he could have lost his leg
SWNS:South West News Service

Tracy was in hospital for nine days before being allowed home.

He kept a wound vacuum dressing on for two months and worked on light duty for six months.

He added: “If people have red marks they need to go get them checked out otherwise they could end up losing a leg.

“To think it was eating my flesh is gross. Something so small can do so much damage.

“I would never wish it on my worst enemy.”


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