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Vietnamese children rescued from people traffickers are feared to have fallen in to the hands of slave masters after disappearing from council care

VIETNAMESE children rescued from people traffickers are feared to have fallen in to the hands of slave masters after disappearing from council care. Local authorities are failing in their duty to safeguard the youngsters, figures obtained by The Times newspaper suggest. More than 150 Vietnamese minors have disappeared from care and foster homes since 2015, […]

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VIETNAMESE children rescued from people traffickers are feared to have fallen in to the hands of slave masters after disappearing from council care.

Local authorities are failing in their duty to safeguard the youngsters, figures obtained by The Times newspaper suggest.

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The missing children are feared to have fallen into the hands of slave masters[/caption]

More than 150 Vietnamese minors have disappeared from care and foster homes since 2015, with almost 90 others going missing temporarily.

At least 21 have vanished this summer, including 12 from Rochdale.

Young trafficking victims of other nationalities have suffered a similar plight, with growing concern about the number of missing Albanian children.

Baroness Butler-Sloss, chairwoman of the all-party parliamentary group on human trafficking and modern slavery, described the figures as “very disturbing” but said that she believed there were far more at risk.

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Baroness Butler-Sloss says the figures are disturbing[/caption]

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12 children are believed to have vanished from Rochdale this summer[/caption]

The former president of the family division of the High Court added:

“The Home Office should explore the possibility of identifying that Vietnamese children present a particular, special problem and are most likely to leave immediately or quickly after coming to care. Some special arrangement should be made for them.”

The Home Office is aware of the issue and is developing an independent advocate system to help councils to address the needs of young trafficking victims.

“We have strengthened regulations on children’s homes and placed a duty on local authorities to tell us about all incidences of children going missing from care, even those lasting less than 24 hours,” a spokesman said.

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Number of children taken into care soars to 90 per day as councils warn that they are reaching a tipping point

A RECORD 90 children a day were taken into care last year – the biggest rise in seven years – official figures show. Town hall chiefs warned councils across England are now at “tipping point”. Figures show the total number of children in foster care or waiting for adoption reached a new high of 72,670 […]

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A RECORD 90 children a day were taken into care last year – the biggest rise in seven years – official figures show.

Town hall chiefs warned councils across England are now at “tipping point”.

Recent figures show that the rate has risen by 2 percent in the last year
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Figures show the total number of children in foster care or waiting for adoption reached a new high of 72,670 in 2016/17 – up from 70,440 the year before.

Last year 32,810 youngsters – equivalent to 90 a day – entered the care system and started to be looked after, a rise of two per cent from the previous year.

Last night Councillor Richard Watt of the Local Government Association called for urgent funding in this Autumn’s Budget to plug the gap.

He said: “Children’s services are at a tipping point with growing demand for support combining with ongoing council funding pressures to become unsustainable.

“Last year saw the biggest rise in the number of children in care for seven years.

“With 90 children coming into care every day, our calls for urgent funding to support these children and invest in children and their families are becoming increasingly urgent.

“Children’s services face a £2 billion funding gap by 2020.

“If nothing is done to address this funding gap, crucial services that many children and families across the country desperately rely on will be put at risk.

The LGA, which represents local authorities in England and Wales, said councils desperately needed more cash to ensure families got the right support they need to avoid children being placed in care.

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