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Oxford to ban petrol and diesel cars in 2020 in bid to be car-free by 2030

OXFORD is hoping to become one of the first cities in the world to ban petrol and diesel vehicles – while allowing electric cars. Only ‘zero-emission’ vehicles will be allowed in six central streets in three years’ time. The car-free zone may then be gradually extended in 2025 and 2030 to include the whole city. […]

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OXFORD is hoping to become one of the first cities in the world to ban petrol and diesel vehicles – while allowing electric cars.

Only ‘zero-emission’ vehicles will be allowed in six central streets in three years’ time.

Rex Features
Fictional TV detective Inspector Morse and his trademark Jaguar Mark II[/caption]

The car-free zone may then be gradually extended in 2025 and 2030 to include the whole city.

The ban would also include buses and types of hybrid cars such as the Toyota Prius.

Even HGVs making deliveries will be outlawed by 2035. Experts said it will cut toxic emissions in the city, which has dangerous air pollution.

The proposal would cost bus operators, taxis, haulage firms and councils an estimated £7million.

The new Toyota Prius would be allowed as it has passed zero emissions tests
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A clear Oxford afternoon but the High Street becomes very congested during rush hours
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They will have to replace vehicles with electric ones. This includes local authority bin lorries and gritters. The city will also have to spend £7million on number plate recognition CCTV to police the ban. Only hybrids which can switch to zero emissions will be allowed.

Offenders would be slapped with a £60 fine.

So even TV’s Inspector Morse would have been be hit. The telly cop, played by the late John Thaw, drove along Oxford’s historic streets in a gas guzzling Jaguar Mark II.

Environment chief John Tanner said the ban is “urgently needed”.

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Electric cars

Petrol and diesel prices soar by 7p per litre – costing you £60 a year more in fuel

BRITS are shelling out an extra £60 a year on petrol and diesel as pump prices have rocketed. The average cost of fuel has risen by seven pence per litre (ppl) since last September sending motorists’ bills through the roof. The extra pence at the pumps has hiked regular motorists’ fill-ups by around £4 a […]

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BRITS are shelling out an extra £60 a year on petrol and diesel as pump prices have rocketed.

The average cost of fuel has risen by seven pence per litre (ppl) since last September sending motorists’ bills through the roof.

Pump prices have soared in the last year
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The extra pence at the pumps has hiked regular motorists’ fill-ups by around £4 a time.

And over the course of the year that’s over £60 extra – and even more for high mileage commuters.

According to Confused.com’s new fuel price check, petrol and diesel is at a six month high.

And compared to September 2016, petrol is now 7.6p more and diesel is 7.2p extra.

Figures based on a regular 45mpg motor doing the UK average 7,900 miles a year, show Brits are now shelling out £954 a year on petrol – up from £893 just 12 months ago.

And diesel owners have seen yearly bills rise from £904 to £962.

TOP TIPS FOR GETTING THE MOST OUT OF YOUR TANK

  • Maintenance – service regularly, use correct engine oil and check tyre pressure
  • Lighten the load – lose excess clutter like boxes or roof racks
  • Plan – know your route and combine trips
  • Smooth ride – accelerate gently and slowly
  • Roll – brake early before stopping and roll to a halt
  • Gears – change gear before your engine exceeds 2,500rpm
  • Cut down on the electrics – turn off rear window heater, demister fan and headlights when not in use
  • Keep it running – don’t turn off your engine unless you are going to be stopped for more than three minutes
  • Coasting – doesn’t save fuel, can wear down brakes and be potentially dangerous

Despite the soaring costs, Confused.com said buyers were still not convinced by switching to cheaper electric power.

Almost eight in 10 motorists said they wouldn’t buy a plug-in as their next motor – because they don’t know where they can charge it or are worried about running out of juice.

Although figures do show drivers would rather buy a hybrid than a diesel as their next car amid uncertainty over its future and a crash in sale prices.

Amanda Stretton, motoring editor at Confused.com, said: “We expect many are still unconvinced about going electric because it sounds like it’s such a long way off.


FUEL DISCLOSURE Will my car be affected by diesel taxes, the diesel scrappage scheme or the 2040 diesel ban?


“But it could come around much sooner as major manufacturers start to commit to electric as early as 2019.

“Drivers could be missing a trick by not switching to new fuel types.

“Diesel and petrol prices are continuing to show an upward curve, impacted in the short term by events such as Storm Harvey and the rising cost in the price per barrel.”

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