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Number of overweight children has increased over ten times since 1970s

OBESITY among children has soared from 11million to 124million worldwide since 1975, a study shows. At the current rate of increase, by 2022 there will be more obese kids than underweight ones for the first time. About 0.9 per cent of boys and 0.7 per cent of girls were obese in 1975. This rose to […]

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OBESITY among children has soared from 11million to 124million worldwide since 1975, a study shows.

At the current rate of increase, by 2022 there will be more obese kids than underweight ones for the first time.

Getty - Contributor
Experts predict more children will be obese than underweight by 2022[/caption]

About 0.9 per cent of boys and 0.7 per cent of girls were obese in 1975.

This rose to 7.8 per cent and 5.6 per cent respectively by 2016, the Lancet medical journal reports.
Much of the increase has taken place in developing countries.

Obesity among young people in Europe and America has levelled off.

Getty - Contributor
Around one in ten kids in the UK are now obese[/caption]

Girls in the UK had the 73rd highest rate in the world and boys the 84th highest.

Study leader Professor Majid Ezzati said: “Obesity rates in children and adolescents have soared globally, and continue to do so in low- and middle-income countries.

“We need ways to make healthy, nutritious food more available at home and school, especially in poor families and communities, and regulations and taxes to protect children from unhealthy foods.”

Leanne Riley, from the World Health Organisation, said: “Without serious, concerted action to address obesity, the health of millions of people will be needlessly placed in great jeopardy.”

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Parents share harrowing last photo of son, 6, hours before he died in hospital of meningitis to raise awareness

THE parents of a six-year-old boy who died from meningitis have released the harrowing last photo of their son in a bid to raise awareness. Oliver Hall died less than 24 hours after first showing signs he was ill. Despite the best efforts of doctors and nurses who “did everything they could” to save Oliver’s […]

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THE parents of a six-year-old boy who died from meningitis have released the harrowing last photo of their son in a bid to raise awareness.

Oliver Hall died less than 24 hours after first showing signs he was ill.

Oliver Hall died of meningitis less than 24 hours after falling ill in October this year
SWNS:South West News Service

Despite the best efforts of doctors and nurses who “did everything they could” to save Oliver’s life, the infection overwhelmed his body.

He passed away at the James Paget University Hospital in Norfolk on October 24.

At the age of six, Oliver was not vaccinated against the strain that cut his young life short – meningitis B.

In September 2015, the MenB vaccine was added to the NHS childhood immuisation programme, but only for babies under the age of 12 months.

The six-year-old's parents are calling for the MenB vaccine to be made available on the NHS to all children
The six-year-old’s parents are calling for the MenB vaccine to be made available on the NHS to all children
SWNS:South West News Service

Now, Oliver’s heartbroken parents are urging the Government to make it available free of charge to all kids.

Bryan and Georgie Hall, from Halesworth in Suffolk, have joined forces with Meningitis Now to raise awareness.

Mrs Hall said: “Oliver achieved so much in his short life. He will always be remembered.”

Now the couple are calling on health secretary Jeremy Hunt and the Government to widen the vaccination programme to protect more children.

The MenB jab was made available in September 2015 to kids under the age of one, but parents of older kids have to pay to have the jab
The MenB jab was made available in September 2015 to kids under the age of one, but parents of older kids have to pay to have the jab
SWNS:South West News Service

“The Government are saying it’s not cost effective to vaccinate more children against this disease.

“Meningitis Now are arguing that point.

“Our main goal is to help them get this vaccination rolled out to more children.”


MORE THAN A RASH What is meningitis, how can you catch it and what are the signs and symptoms of the deadly disease?


The charity argues that a vaccine for all would be cost-effective, when compared with the cost of treating the devastating disease.

Meningitis can affect people of all ages, but is more common in babies and young children.

Teenagers and young adults – particularly university students – are also at high risk, because they live and socialise close together, raising the risk of the disease spreading quickly.

On Friday, the Meningitis Research Foundation urged people to be alert to the signs and symptoms of the disease, as cases of the deadly infection are expected to treble over the festive period.

Oliver's parents have set up a fundraising website in their son's name, raising money for Meningitis Now
Oliver’s parents have set up a fundraising website in their son’s name, raising money for Meningitis Now
SWNS:South West News Service

There are five main groups of meningitis, but meningococcal B (Men B) is the most common, responsible for 55 per cent of cases of meningococcal meningitis.

While the MenB jab is available free of charge on the NHS to babies, it can be bought privately.

Boots and other pharmacies offer the two-dose course at a cost of £220.

Last month Mrs Hall met MPs and other families, who have lost their children to meningitis.

“On the back of this meeting, they are looking into setting up a working party with the main aim of looking into the cost effectiveness of the vaccine and rolling it out to children.

“That is a positive step.”

The couple set up the Oliver Hall Forever Fund tribute website, to raise money for Meningitis Now.

So far more than £4,000 has been raised in Oliver’s memory.

His mum added: “To see that total going up makes us feel that Oliver’s life was not in vain.”


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Major recall of baby formula ‘contaminated with salmonella bacteria’

FRENCH baby milk formula Lactalis has been recalled globally over fears of salmonella contamination. Health bosses confirmed 26 children in France have become sick and have ordered a recall in Britain, China, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sudan. Michel Nalet, a spokesman for Lactalis, told AFP that “nearly 7,000 tonnes” of formula may have been contaminated. But the […]

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FRENCH baby milk formula Lactalis has been recalled globally over fears of salmonella contamination.

Health bosses confirmed 26 children in France have become sick and have ordered a recall in Britain, China, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sudan.

Nearly 7,000 tonnes of the baby formula is thought to be contaminated with the bacteria

Michel Nalet, a spokesman for Lactalis, told AFP that “nearly 7,000 tonnes” of formula may have been contaminated.

But the company is unable to determine how much is currently on the market, has been consumed or is in stock.

Lactalis is one of the world’s biggest producers of dairy products and is marketed globally under a host of brand names, including Milumel, Picot and Celi.

The company believes the salmonella outbreak can be traced to an evaporation tower – used to dry out the milk – at a factory in the town of Craon in northwest France.

Salmonella is a common food poisoning bug that causes severe diarrhoea, stomach cramps and vomiting
Salmonella is a common food poisoning bug that causes severe diarrhoea, stomach cramps and vomiting
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All products made there since February 15 have been recalled, Nalet said.

He added that the company was taking fresh precautionary measures of disinfecting all of its machinery at the factory.


TUMMY BUG What is salmonella, what are the symptoms and treatment and how is it spread?


The latest recall expands a health scare that began at the beginning of December after 20 children in france under the age of six became ill.

A limited recall was originally put in place but regulators later found the measures put in place by Lactalis were “not sufficient to manage the risk of contamination”.

Salmonella is a common food poisoning bug that causes severe diarrhoea, stomach cramps and vomiting.

The illness, caused by intestinal bacteria from farm animals, can prove deadly for the very young and elderly because of the risk of dehydration.

The children in France have since recovered and Lactalis is “not aware” of any more outbreaks.

It is not the first time the baby milk industry has been shaken by a health scare.

In 2008 six babies died and 300,000 became sick when local manufacturers in China were found to be bulking their products with an industrial chemical.


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Warning as four more cases of potentially deadly measles confirmed in UK – here’s how to spot the signs

HEALTH bosses are urging parents to vaccinate their kids against measles after more cases of the potentially deadly disease have been confirmed. Four children in Manchester have been confirmed to have the highly-contagious bug which causes cold-like symptoms, a fever, aches and pains and a blotchy red rash. It comes after other health services have also been […]

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HEALTH bosses are urging parents to vaccinate their kids against measles after more cases of the potentially deadly disease have been confirmed.

Four children in Manchester have been confirmed to have the highly-contagious bug which causes cold-like symptoms, a fever, aches and pains and a blotchy red rash.

Alamy
Doctors are warning of a potential measles outbreak in the UK[/caption]

It comes after other health services have also been struck with the infection, with 28 confirmed cases in Leeds, 18 in Liverpool, 13 in Birmingham and seven in Surrey and Sussex – prompting warnings Britain could be on the verge of a measles outbreak.

Dr Will Welfare, Consultant in Health Protection with Public Health England, told Manchester Evening News: “Measles is a very infectious virus and can spread rapidly among communities, such as schools, if people have not been fully immunised.

“I would appeal to any parents who have not yet had their children vaccinated to get them protected as soon as possible through their GP.”

Measles is highly contagious disease that can be prevented by having the vaccination, offered by the NHS as a single measles, mumps and rubella jab.

A tweet by NHS Choices said: “There is an outbreak of measles in both Leeds and Liverpool.

“This infectious viral illness is easily spread and can lead to complications.

“Ask your GP about the vaccine if you, or your children, haven’t had 2 doses.”

Travellers bound for Christmas markets in Europe have also been warned they are at risk of catching the potentially deadly disease.

WHAT IS MEASLES? HOW TO SPOT THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS

Measles is a highly infectious viral illness that can be very unpleasant and sometimes lead to serious complications.

It’s now uncommon in the UK because of the effectiveness of vaccination.

Anyone can get measles if they haven’t been vaccinated or they haven’t had it before.

It usually clears in 7 to 10 days but can lead to other serious complications.

Symptoms:

Initial symptoms include:

  • cold-like symptoms like runny nose, sneezing and a cough
  • sore, red eyes
  • fever
  • small grey-white spots on the inside of the cheeks
  • aches and pains

A few days later a red-brown, blotchy rash will appear, usually beginning on the head or upper neck before spreading.

You’ll most likely feel most ill the first few days the rash appears.

Complications:

About one in every 5,000 people will die from measles.

Complications are more likely to develop in:

  • babies younger than a year old
  • children with a poor diet
  • children with a weakened immune system

The most common complications include diarrhoea and vomiting, ear infections, eye infection, pneumonia and bronchitis.

But measles can also lead to other complications, although these are rare:

  • hepatitis
  • brain infections
  • eye problems and vision loss
  • heart and nervous system problems
  • miscarriage or still birth
  • premature birth
  • low birth weight

Treatment:

There is no specific treatment.

Your GP will probably suggest resting at home and waiting for it to clear.

You can ease your symptoms with pain killers, but always speak to your GP first.

You can avoid measles by getting vaccinated.

One dose of vaccine can be given to a baby when they are 12-13 months old and a second before they start school.

Countries where vaccination levels are higher have less chance of the disease spreading.

Source: NHS Choices

Public Health England (PHE) has urged those heading for Italy, Germany and Romania, in particular, to take extra care.

Health chiefs warned those people who haven’t had both doses of the MMR vaccine, are at greatest risk of infection.


HEALTH CHECK What is measles? How contagious is it, is there a vaccine, what are the symptoms and how is it treated?


It came as PHE confirmed three outbreaks in England are linked to people travelling to the continent.

Dr Mary Ramsay, Head of Immunisation at PHE, said: “This serves as an important reminder for parents to take up the offer of MMR vaccination for their children at one year of age and as a pre-school booster at three years and four months of age.

“Children and young adults who missed out on their MMR vaccine in the past or are unsure if they had two doses should contact their GP practice to catch-up.”

The MMR jab is a combined vaccine, which protects against measles, mumps and rubella.

In order to be fully protected, it is important to have both doses of the vaccination.

Anyone who might suspect they have the infection is advised to stay at home and call their GP or NHS 111.

The MMR vaccine prevents the spread of the virus, but there are still ways to seek treatment if you contract it
The MMR vaccine prevents the spread of the virus, but there are still ways to seek treatment if you contract it
Alamy

The World Health Organisation has previously warned of a measles outbreak sweeping through Europe.

The large-scale outbreaks are happening in countries where immunisation rates have dropped, the agency said.

It’s now uncommon in the UK because of high vaccination rates.

As a result it is unlikely a widespread outbreak will happen, but smaller, localised cases could happen in parts where large numbers of kids and babies have not had their vaccine.

Anyone can get measles if they haven’t already had it, but it is more common in young children.

It starts with cold like symptoms before a rash develops a few days later.

The rash looks like small, red-brown blotches and can make a person feel very unwell.

Severe complications can occur, including miscarriage in pregnant women, brain swelling and the risk of death from pneumonia.

The virus is spread through coughing and sneezing and through close contact with infected individuals.

Currently, the biggest outbreaks are in Romania and Italy.


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